Time to test the time lapse

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Still from a Time Lapse series: The soupy frozen sea in front of Puerto Eden after an exceptionally cold night. (c) Katie McConnell 2016

After all the chaos of last minute expedition purchases and logistics, boarding the Navimag and arriving to tranquil Puerto Eden was a great relief. Although we were busy packing Saoirse and preparing for departure during the day, it was a perfect time to finally begin testing out the Trail Cameras and make sure they are all set to go before being installed for 6 months in Golfo de Penas.

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Still from a time lapse series: Valentina and I are marking and putting batteries and SD cards in all 17 cameras. As you can see from the thermometer we city-slickers weren’t too good at getting the fire in the stove going! (c) Katie McConnell

Learning a lot!

By testing the cameras, I was able to see some potential issues and now have the chance to troubleshoot before final installation.

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Still from a Time Lapse: Morning dew fogs the lens at the Pto. Eden seaside. For short-term shots, an oxygen activated hand warmer places near the lens might be enough to keep the dew away.   (c) Katie McConnell

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Here comes the sun! Turns out I might not want to have the camera facing into the sunrise or sunset… (c) Katie McConnell 2016

 

 

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…however, the sun quickly dried up all the dew, leaving the lens clear again. (c) Katie McConnell 2016

 

One of the best things about these trail cameras is their Time Lapse capabilities. An attractive component of Time Lapse is the illusion of speeding up time and observing progress on a different scale. Unfortunately,  I don’t have the internet capabilities to upload short video clips right now, but when I return in a little over a month I am going to try and upload some short and interesting clips.

These cameras will provide new insights into the fate of large inputs of newly available organic nutrients in a terrestrial/intertidal ecosystem, descriptions of the stages and rates of decomposition, and, with luck, help to create the first identification record of cetaceans in the Golfo de Penas region.

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Time lapse camera test captures the team testing the CTD on Saoirse (c) Katie McConnell 2016

 

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